);

Common Travel Myths & Why They’re Wrong

Common Travel Myths & Why They’re Wrong

Travel as a whole is an exciting experience that can be had in many different ways – whether you’re a solo adventurer or getting out there with your friends or family, there’s plenty of opportunities to be found. With a major shift to remote working, a digital nomad lifestyle like the many who have come before here could be on the rise with travel being much more accessible, but that also means the many myths around will certainly get their time in the spotlight once more – but what are some of these myths, and why aren’t they as reliable as many would suggest?

(Image from backpackerbible.org)

Travel is expensive – Many well-travelled individuals will tell you that it can come at a huge cost – and whilst yes, all travel does cost some money, and there are premiums to pay, not all travel is about having fancy experiences and paying out for big trips. Typically, the marketing does lend itself to suggest that a vacation is a fun, but expensive experience, but that doesn’t always need to be the case as a great experience can be had on a budget. There’s plenty of tips on how to have a great travel experience without breaking the bank, and even ways to make what funds you do have for potential travel go much further too.

Couchsurfing is unsafe – Accommodation will typically be a large part of budgeting for any trip, and whilst modern apps like Airbnb have helped reduce costs, there are other options with the likes of couch surfing too with an entire app dedicated to it – many will suggest that it isn’t safe, but if you’re travelling on a budget, it can be a very safe, and very enjoyable way to enjoy your trip too. Many countries are also more adopting of the change too, some such as Finland for example boast nearly 200,000 hosts willing to accept couch surfers, and with a population of around 5.5 million, that’s a huge number.

Budget travel isn’t possible if you’re not single and alone – Whilst true, travelling by yourself as a young single person is much easier, that isn’t to say it’s not something easily possible with a family or with a group of friends too. Whilst an older audience may favour more comfort than the backpacking lifestyle could provide, for those willing to compromise a little there are plenty of opportunities to experience travel at a lower cost regardless of age and whether or not you have someone with you.

At the end of the day, travel is for everyone and it’s about finding the best possible experience in the best possible way you can do it, it is after all your own experience and nobody else’s, so you make the most of it in the best way  you know how.

Back to top